Notes on the Waymo v. Uber Jury Selection

Waymo v. Uber settled, but not before jury selection and four days of evidence. We’re lucky in the Bay Area to have a series of high-profile, high-stakes, high-tech cases coursing through our courts: the multiple trials of Apple v. Samsung, Oracle v. Google, and now, Waymo v. Uber.

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Preparing Witnesses with Limited English Proficiency

Any attorney or consultant who has prepped their fair share of witnesses understands that different witnesses present different challenges. Those challenges can depend on things as simple as their appearance, their willingness to make eye contact, choice of words, and even their (lack of) sense of humor. For some situations, there are nuanced challenges that […]

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Implicit Bias: Process & Remedies

  We’ve encountered, and contended with, implicit bias in our work as trial consultants. Some clients are curious as to how implicit bias works and how we can counteract it. In our other posts, we cover practical and academic aspects of implicit bias including how biases impact bench trials, jury trials, and arbitration. In the […]

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Jury Pool Profile: Jury Selections in Alameda County

We gathered data from few of our recent Alameda County (CA) jury selections. In this post you’ll find helpful information about the most commonly used statistics, like age and education. In a separate post, we cover these same jurors’ key opinions of lawsuits and damages awards. Age The majority of Alameda County jurors fall between […]

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Comparing Demographic Characteristics for Key Patent Venues Post-TC Heartland

We’re Not in East Texas Anymore… The Eastern District of Texas has already experienced a significant decline in patent case filings since the May 2017 United States Supreme Court decision, TC Heartland LLC v. Kraft Foods Groups Brands. Researchers trace this decline, and report that Delaware and California are likely to see a significant increase […]

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“Collective Knowledge” of a Corporation

The Concept of Collective Knowledge The issue of whether a corporation’s conduct is “knowing” is often an important step in determining whether a corporation can be found guilty of criminal conduct.  But how does a corporation “know” something?  While this concept is sometimes difficult to discern for individuals, it is extremely complicated when the defendant […]

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The High-Tech Juror

Almost all of our Bay Area jury selections indicate a strong presence of jurors who have training in engineering.  For example, in 2010, we were working with a client on a case in the San Francisco Division of the Northern District of California.  The seated jury had a total of eight jurors, and six of […]

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